Week 1 Response

In the article “Understanding Rhetoric, A Graphic Guide to Writing”, the authors use comic relief to get the audiences attention and their point across. In the comic it shows the rhetoric is often seen with a negative connotation that stunts discussion when its origin was meant to promote healthy debate and discussion. I believe rhetoric is essential in our every day lives. Rhetoric allows us to present ourselves in a professional and knowledgeable manner enabling us to communicate with others in our field and daily lives.

The article continues with rhetoric and shows us how Plato frowned upon rhetoric and believed it was a distraction and showed weakness. Aristotle on the other hand looked at rhetoric much differently. Ethos, pathos and logos are three areas of communication that Aristotle believed encompassed rhetoric. These three ideas ethos (ethics), pathos (empathy) and logos (logic) have always been very interesting to me. When I think about communicating effectively, I think of these three terms at their core. Pathos or emotion is critical in drawing the audience in and showing them why what your saying should matter. Ethos or credibility is essential in any conversation where you want to be heard. I mean who wants to listen to someone that has no experience about what they are talking about? Logos or logic is vital in completing well rounded thoughts. These three words together allow us to communicate with each other effectively and draw other attention to our causes.

The article also introduces us to Kairos. This term is interesting to me especially because I haven’t studied it before, and it makes you think a little deeper. Kairos connects rhetoric to space and time. Is what you’re saying applicable to the time and place. In the business world this is so important. You have a small window of time to capitalize on ideas. Thoughts and ideas that are important around the world right now may not be seen important tomorrow.

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